III Communication

Covering The NHL's Conference III Better Than Anyone On The Whole Internet. Like Ma Bell, We Got The III Communication

Month: March, 2014

[Redacted]: Crown of Fecal Matter Update

by obscenealex

Richard Peverley eating cereal out of the Stanley Cup

If players eat cereal out of Lord Stanley, what do they eat out of the Fecal Fedora?

It’s almost the end of the season… that time of year when the Crown of [Fecal Matter] stops traveling, settles down, and gets comfortable on the heads of players, occasionally being removed so they can eat Cheerios out of it, bathe their kids in it, and maybe even throw it off balconies and give it lap dances.  Will players from your team spend the summer getting frisky with the Fecal Fedora?  Let’s review where the Sombrero de Mierda has been and where it may end up.  As always, new wearers are bolded.  Teams shamefully retaining the Crown are italicized.

 

Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

Great Game Previews In History: 31 March 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

On this date in 1146, with King Louis VII alongside, French Cistercian abbot Bernard of Clairvaux takes to the podium in a field at Vézelay and gave a speech which inspired the Second Crusade.

O ye who listen to me! Hasten to appease the anger of heaven, but no longer implore its goodness by vain complaints. Clothe yourselves in sackcloth, but also cover yourselves with your impenetrable bucklers. The din of arms, the danger, the labors, the fatigues of war, are the penances that God now imposes upon you. Hasten then to expiate your sins by victories over the Infidels, and let the deliverance of the holy places be the reward of your repentance.”

The assembled responded with that French call of old: “Deus vult!” and Bernard shouted back “Cursed be he who does not stain his sword with blood.”

No pressure.

Read the rest of this entry »

Great Game Previews In History: 30 March 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

Two hundred years ago on the dot, the forces of the Sixth Coalition march into Paris, beginning the battle of same, the end of which would result in Napoleon being sent to Elba.

After his failed invasion of Russia, Napoleon retreated back towards France, pursued by the Prussians, Russians and Austrians. A battle was joined at Leipzig and after the Coalition victory, both Tsar Alexander and Prussia’s King Frederick William III wished to invade France proper.

Alexander, in particular, wanted to march into Paris as Napoleon marched into Moscow. It would be the first time a foreign force marched into Paris in 400 years.

 

Read the rest of this entry »

DemocraThree: 28 March 2014

by J.R.

demo210

Every Friday bloggers from around The Heptarchy will update us on the news and notes from their teams (with that fancy header image courtesy of Mike D; like democracy itself, it’s a perpetual work-in-progress). Yes, we ripped this off from TRH’s Pacific War Room; no, we don’t care. And since we ripped it off, we’ll follow their lead and go in standings order.

Read the rest of this entry »

Great Game Previews In History: 28 March 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

In 1979, Margaret Thatcher — then Leader of the Opposition — puts the motion “That this House has no confidence in Her Majesty’s Government,” at the time led by Prime Minister James Callaghan, a historic dingbat, who led (“led”) Britain through the devastating Winter of Discontent.

The motion carries by one vote, forcing Callaghan to call an election and resulting in 18 years of Conservative government in the UK.

This is all very complicated, but in short, Callaghan had considered calling an election in 1978, but decided to wait a year so the economy would improve. The economy did not improve — it, in fact, fell apart — and then a referendum on devolution in Scotland failed, which angered the Scottish nationalists, which had supported the Labour government and angered the Liberals, which supported devolution and were miffed by the high vote threshold set for passage.

Anyway, everyone was put out with Callaghan and there was a very exciting vote and debate on March 28, 1979.

 

Read the rest of this entry »

Thursday Thirteen: Final Fortnight Forthcoming

by J.R.

Every Thursday we bring you III Communication’s Conference III Power Rankings, the Thursday Thirteen.

This week, we’ve got two weeks left (more or less).

 

Read the rest of this entry »

Great Game Previews In History: 27 March 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

The Naval Act of 1794 — passed on this day in, uh, 1794 — authorized the building of the first six frigates of the U.S. Navy. A real original six.

One of them — the Constitution — is still in commission in Charlestown Navy Yard and part of the Navy’s educational outreach programs.

That leaves five and, wouldn’t ya know, there are five Conference III games today.

 

Read the rest of this entry »

Looking Ahead In The Conference III Belt Race

by J.R.

With last night’s win in Nashville, Colorado won its first Conference III Belt, becoming the sixth team in two weeks to have the title (only Minnesota hasn’t had a reign in that time) and continuing a run of one-and-done champions.

The six other teams had already had a turn with the strap and Colorado waiting so long for its reign has implications for who will ultimately finish the season with the title (as noted before, the Belt will not travel into the playoffs, even if a playoff team ends up with it).

For now, six teams have the chance to hold the hardware at season’s end. Winnipeg is the only team without a path to the title.

Let’s take a look at where the Belt could go.

 

Read the rest of this entry »

Great Game Previews In History: 26 March 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

During the Breton War of Succession in 1351, thirty knights and squires from the House of Blois and thirty from the House of Montfront met in an arranged battle — the Combat des Trente — midway between the castles of Josselin and Ploërmel during a war fought to determine who would be king of Brittany.

The battle had little to no effect on the outcome of the war — ultimately won by the English-backed Montfort, though terms in the peace treaty ensured that a successor who would be friendly to the French would eventually take the throne of Brittany — but is nonetheless the most remembered part of a relatively-forgotten war.

According to legend, the battle was simply a chivalric exercise, fought in honor of the women who led the two factions: Joan of Brittany and the eventually-crazy Joanna of Flanders; however, other historians claim that the people of the countryside had been abused by the Montfort’s and umbrage was taken by the House of Blois’ Jean de Beaumanoir.

In any event, this wasn’t a battle that would seem normal to modern military historians (or to fans of Conference III). The two sides fought for hours to no result and then (this blows my mind) TOOK A BREAK FOR REFRESHMENTS.

“Je suis tellement soif!”
“Alright, mate, that’s drinks then.”

 

Read the rest of this entry »

Great Game Previews In History: 25 March 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

Robert_The_Bruce_Crowned_King_of_ScotsOn March 25, 1306, Robert the Bruce is crowned King of Scots by Bishop William de Lamberton at Scone.

The royal robes and vestments which had been hidden from the English — who, of course, the Scots were at war with at the time — were brought out by the Bishop and set upon the king.

All this happened six weeks after Robert killed a rival claimant, John Comyn — who was far more powerful and far more resolute in his opposition to the English — in the chapel at Greyfriars monastery.

At that point, Robert had a choice to be either a fugitive or assert his right to be king. He confessed the murder and sacrilege, was absolved and made his way to his coronation.

 

Read the rest of this entry »