III Communication

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Great Game Previews in History: 8 February 2014

by J.R.

Today in History

_65729396_shergar_getty304In 1983, Irish racehorse Shergar disappears — much as the NHL season will briefly disappear today — seized not by the patriotic fervor the Olympic endears, but by armed gunmen who almost certainly (though not definitely) were members of the Provisional Irish Republican Army attempting to extort the horse’s ownership syndicate — including various Astors and the Aga Khan IV — for money to purchase arms.

Shergar was, perhaps, the most famous racehorse in the world in 1983, having won the Irish Derby and King George in 1981, retiring with a record of 6-1 and remaining in Ireland to stand stud, an unexpected move. But then he was stolen and never seen again.

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Conference III Championship Belt Tale Of The Tape: Winnipeg at St. Louis, 8 February 2014

by J.R.

This afternoon, St. Louis defends the Conference III Championship Belt one last time before the Olympics as Winnipeg comes to town.

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Great Game Previews In History: 1 February 2014

by J.R.

Today in History

441px-Edward_III_of_England_(Order_of_the_Garter)Following the deposition of his father by his mother, Isabella, and Roger Mortimer, Edward III accedes to the English throne on this date in 1327.

He was just 14, so Isabella and Roger pretty much steered the ship of state, which was the plan all along after the had Edward II arrested for “incompetence; allowing others to govern him to the detriment of the people and Church; not listening to good advice and pursuing occupations unbecoming to a monarch; having lost Scotland and lands in Gascony and Ireland through failure of effective governance; damaging the Church, and imprisoning its representatives; allowing nobles to be killed, disinherited, imprisoned and exiled; failing to ensure fair justice, instead governing for profit and allowing others to do likewise; and of fleeing in the company of a notorious enemy of the realm, leaving it without government, and thereby losing the faith and trust of his people.”

Given the choice between abdicating in favor of his son or resisting and risking that a non-royal would take power (presumably, this would have been Mortimer, who, in fact, ended up in charge anyway), Edward II abdicated and Edward III became king.

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Great Game Previews In History: 31 January 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

472px-Explorer_1_conferenceExplorer I, the first American satellite (and the third overall after a pair of Sputniks), rides to space atop a Juno I rocket, on this day in 1958.

It was the beginning of the successful U.S. space program and, ergo, the beginning of the Cold War Space Race.

It stayed under power for 136 days and in orbit until 1970 making more than 58,000 orbits.

Hers was a scientific mission — part of the International Geophysical Year — but there’s no doubt there was a little of “oh hey Russia we can do that, too (finally!)” involved too. After all, the U.S. trotted out Wernher von Braun at the press conference (as pictured). That’s a little bit of a how-do-you-do to the Soviets.

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Great Game Previews In History: 29 January 2014

by J.R.

Today in History

an_lushan__military_leader_during_the_tang_dynasty446998c9b8159bbeb173In 757, Chinese Emperor and general An Lushan is assassinated by his favored eunuch Li Zhu’er at the behest of An’s first son, An Qingxu.

An Lushan had gone blind, developed full-body ulcers, and gotten angry (as anyone would if blinded and covered in ulcers) and was in the habit of executing those who angered him. Knowing he was close to the end, it was rumored he planned to name a younger son, An Qing’en, as his successor. Thus, An Qingxu, afraid his father would have him killed, conspired with the eunuch and a general, Yan Zhuang, to instead kill the emperor.

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Great Game Previews In History: 24 January 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

California_Clipper_500On this day in 1848, James Marshall, a foreman, discovers gold at Sutter’s Mill on the American River in California, setting off the Gold Rush.

At first they came from just Oregon and Hawaii and Latin America, but then did they come from everywhere.

San Francisco — perhaps 1,000 residents in 1848 — became a virtual ghost town and then boomed as people from elsewhere arrived, growing to 25,000 people by 1850.

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Great Game Previews In History: 22 January 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

James_II_&_VIIIn 1689, the Convention Parliament convened in London to decide the matter of who was the rightful monarch of Great Britain with James II (James VII in Scotland) having committed two grievous errors: fleeing to France and being Catholic.

It was a tough time to be an English monarch. It hadn’t been that long since Charles I had his head displaced from his neck and James’ brother, Charles II had just died, converting to Catholicism on his death bed (!). James himself had two Protestant daughters, so Protestant folk in England were not too concerned that his increasingly pro-Catholic policies would last long. But then his wife gave birth to a son — James Francis Edward Stuart, who was baptized Catholic. Then it all kicked off.

Protestant leadership reached out to William of Orange (James’ daughter’s Mary’s husband) to foment an invasion. James refused the aid of Louis XIV, fled London ahead of William’s invasion, threw the Great Seal in the Thames, was arrested, allowed to escape and eventually posted up with Louis in France.

Thus, the Convention Parliament had a decision to make — did James abdicate or did he just vacate the throne (hilariously, there’s no provision for abdication at common law — something that would be problematic later)? Who would be heir (convolutedly, they settled on William and Mary ruling together)?

Complicating all of this, of course, was that the Convention Parliament wasn’t legitimate, setting a precedent for things called “Conventions” for years to come.

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The RodIIIna

by J.R.

And finally, your Conference III Russian Olympians:

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Happy Hour In The Heptarchy: Cute Animal Pictures And Christmas Songs

by J.R.

Help III Communication celebrate Festivus by airing some grievances and what have you.

It’s five past 5 across Conference III (leave work early, Colorado — you have our permission), time to hit bricks and get that freakin’ weekend started, am I right?

Of course I am.

It’s been a tough week for some of you so loosen your belt, pop a top, grab a spoon and stop being such a sourpuss. III Communication’s got good news for everybody.

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3dō: Saturday Singalong

by J.R.

3dō is an occasional feature in which the meaning of Conference III is explained through prose, verse, song, interpretative dance, film, chemical formulae or illustrative anecdote relayed by old people.

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