III Communication

Covering The NHL's Conference III Better Than Anyone On The Whole Internet. Like Ma Bell, We Got The III Communication

Tag: Alex Chiasson

[Redacted]: At My Wits’ and Season’s End

by obscenealex

Welcome to the last [Redacted] of the 2013-14 regular season.  When I first started this [sludge stack] I didn’t know what to expect.  I knew I could write but I’d never written about hockey and I wasn’t sure if I could keep it going week after week.  I’ve had a great time in the short half season I’ve shared my obscene, outlandish and/or ridiculous thoughts with you and I’ve met some cool people.  Thank you for embracing me and enjoying [Redacted].  You [beloved people] are all right.

This week, I’m going to open with some housekeeping and then get down to business.

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Great Game Previews In History: 1 April 2014

by J.R.

Today in History

The Recapture of Bahia begins on April 1, 1625 as a combined Spanish and Portuguese force made an effort to take back the Brazilian port town of Salvador da Bahia from the Dutch during the Eighty Years War (these countries, incredibly, were world powers in the 17th century and boy does that seem weird).

In May 1624, Dutch West Indies Company forces commanded by Jacob Willekens captured Bahia from the Portuguese. Philip IV, king of Spain and Portugal, ordered a Spanish-Portuguese fleet set sail with the objective of recovering the city. Sailing from the port of Lisbon under the command of Fadrique Álvarez de Toledo y Mendoza, the fleet crossed the Atlantic.

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[Redacted] Week in Review: Stop the [Bovine Excreta]

by obscenealex

I’m not in a welcoming mood this week.  Get off my [well-manicured] lawn.

Oh, I have to write a column for you to read?  Well [gird yourself] then, you spoiled [solipsist].  Here it is:

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DemocraThree: 14 March 2014

by J.R.

demo210

Every Friday bloggers from around The Heptarchy will update us on the news and notes from their teams (with that fancy header image courtesy of Mike D; like democracy itself, it’s a perpetual work-in-progress). Yes, we ripped this off from TRH’s Pacific War Room; no, we don’t care. And since we ripped it off, we’ll follow their lead and go in standings order.

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The [Redacted] Week in Review with Obscene Alex: Team USA Edition

by obscenealex

As he does every Monday, Obscene Alex joins us with his thoughts of the week. My redactions are in brackets:

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Great Game Previews In History: 6 January 2013

by J.R.

Today In History

800px-South_Sea_BubbleThe Committee of Inquiry on the South Sea Bubble published its findings in 1721.

In 1711, the South Sea Company was given a Parliamentary monopoly on English trade to South America, which didn’t matter because England was fighting the War of Spanish Succession at the time and Spain controlled South America.

To make money, therefore, the South Sea Company took on national debt and sold shares of stock. And by sold, I mean, “gave away to powerful people and then used the fact that powerful people ‘bought’ stock to sell stock to normal people, thus inflating its price, leading to a precipitous bubble burst and causing serious detriment to the British economy.”

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IIIiteracy: Six Teams, Five Games

by J.R.

Quick analysis of the Predators 4-2 win over Toronto tonight:

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Great Game Previews In History: 14 November 2013

by J.R.

Today In History

sticker,375x360.u2In the wildly-misspelled town of Apalachin, New York, a state trooper named Edgar Croswell did some top-notch police work.

Aware that Bonano crime family boss Carmine Galante had earlier visited the country estate of Joseph “Joe The Barber” Barbara of the Bufalino crime family. Croswell learned that Galante had an extensive New York City criminal record (including a revoked driver’s license), so he put Barbara’s house under surveillance. Then, because word travels fast in a small town, he learned that Barbara’s son was booking up most of the town’s hotel rooms and ordering a prodigious amount of meat. Thus, he stepped up security.

State police saw an extensive number of luxury cars parked at the Barbara home and set up a roadblock.

As a result of the road block, on November 14, 1957, more than 100 mafioso were arrested in the midst of the Apalachin Meeting, a gathering of the bosses set to discuss La Cosa Nostra operations such as gambling, casinos and narcotics dealing along with the dividing the illegal operations controlled by the recently killed Albert Anastasia and to attempt to stop the looming Gambino-Genovese war.

Some of the gangsters were arrested fleeing through the woods, ruining their expensive suits and scattering $100 bills that would be found by locals for months after and also inspiring Paul Holmgren’s GMing style.

Interestingly, Eliot H. Lumbard, one of the prosecutors in the case, died recently.

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IIIiteracy: 24 October 2013

by J.R.

A recap of tonight’s Conference III action with help from the geniuses on social media:

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Great Game Previews In History: 20 October 2013

by J.R.

479px-Louisiana1804aToday In History

The United States ratified the treaty authorizing the Louisiana Purchase by a vote of 24-7. The seven no votes came from senators from Massachusetts, Connecticut, Delaware and New Hampshire — predictably staunch opposition from Flortheast and Metro territory.

The U.S. paid three cents per acre for the 820,000 square mile territory which would eventually become part of 15 states — all of which are in Conference III — and, in fact, a small sliver of what would become Alberta (not Conference III) and Saskatchewan (Conference III!).

While the Louisiana Purchase and Conference III country broadly have significant overlap, only three Conference III cities were part of the purchase: St. Louis, St. Paul and Denver.

The other four cities were part of other territorial expansions, to wit:

Chicago: What is now Chicago was, actually, part of French Louisiana but was ceded to the British under the 1763 Treaty of Paris ending the French and Indian War. George Rogers Clark took control of it during the Revolution, claiming it for Virginia, which ceded it to the U.S. after the war and it became part of the Northwest Territory (memorialized in the name of Northwestern University).

Dallas: The Louisiana Purchase did dip into Texas, but not far enough to include what would become Dallas. It was Spanish until Texas Independence.

Nashville: Middle Tennessee was claimed by more or less everybody — it, too, was French and, in fact, a French-Canadian was in Nashville before James Robertson and John Donelson came to start Fort Nashborough. Tennessee was just western North Carolina before statehood and was already a state by the time the Louisiana Purchase went through. In fact, Meriwether Lewis died rather suspiciously in Tennessee.

Winnipeg: Manitoba was part of something called “Rupert’s Land,” which is about the most Canadian thing I’ve ever heard.

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