III Communication

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Tag: Carolina Hurricanes

Great Game Previews In History: 21 October 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

Near Leesburg, Virginia on October 21, 1861, Union and Confederate forces clash in the Battle of Ball’s Bluff, one of the early engagements of the Civil War.

Maj. Gen. George “Wha?” McClellan sent Brig. Gen. George McCall to see what had been going on down near Leesburg. Several reconnoitering expeditions resulted in very little, as did McClellan’s order that the 1st Minnesota make a “slight demonstration” to draw out the Confederates.

McClellan ordered McCall to return to Langley and, in the meantime, a scouting party from the 15th Massachusetts discovered a stand of trees which they mistook for a Confederate camp, thus they were ordered to take 300 men and attack this stand of trees.

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Great Game Previews In History: 4 April 2014

by J.R.

Today in History

547px-Bayeux_Tapestry_scene1_EDWARD_REXOn April 3, 1043 at Winchester Cathedral, Edward the Confessor is crowned as king.

His accession is a little bit of a complicated story (the relatively simple determination of who is to be the next heir to the throne in Britain is a modern creation). Edward was the seventh son of Æthelred the Unready. When Æthelred died, he was succeeded by Edward’s older half-brother, Edmund Ironside, who was fighting the Dane Cnut for control of England. When Edmund died, Cnut took the throne, exiled Edward and married his mother.

When Cnut died, Harthacnut — Edward’s mother’s son with Cnut — succeeded to the throne of Denmark, but couldn’t take that of England, which instead went to Harold Harefoot. When Edward and his brother Alfred came back to England, Harold had Alfred blinded by a red-hot poker (or, as the NHL calls it, “upper body injury”).

Eventually Harold died, Harthacnut became king and invited Edward back. The latter was proclaimed as successor, supported by the most powerful earls in the country and chosen by the people of Lond0n.

He would be the last Anglo-Saxon king of England.

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Great Game Previews In History: 23 March 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

312px-Parliament_Stamp_Act1765On March 22, 1765, King George III gave the Royal Assent to “An act for granting and applying certain stamp duties, and other duties, in the British colonies and plantations in America, towards further defraying the expences of defending, protecting, and securing the same; and for amending such parts of the several acts of parliament relating to the trade and revenues of the said colonies and plantations, as direct the manner of determining and recovering the penalties and forfeitures therein mentioned.”

We just call it the Stamp Act of 1765. It was unpopular among the colonists, who argued they were being taxed without their consent, and instead of raging blindly, they set up committees of correspondence and congresses and you know the rest (“The rest” is “America owns”).

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Great Game Previews In History: 21 March 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

429px-King_Henry_V_from_NPGSix hundred and one years ago, Henry V accedes to the throne of England.

He is remembered for being a bit of a “riotous youth” and a “scapegrace,” in part due to the immortalization of Shakespeare, though there is very little in the actual, non-Shakesperean record to support this, but after six centuries it’s unlikely we’ll remember him any other way.

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DemocraThree: 7 March 2014

by J.R.

demomk2

Every Friday (except this week obviously) [Ed note: I’m an idiot] bloggers from around The Heptarchy will update us on the news and notes from their teams (with that fancy header image courtesy of Mike D; like democracy itself, it’s a perpetual work-in-progress). Yes, we ripped this off from TRH’s Pacific War Room; no, we don’t care. And since we ripped it off, we’ll follow their lead and go in standings order.

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The [Redacted] Week in Review: It’s Otter Time

by obscenealex

Welcome to the [Redacted] Week in Review – I’m your HMFIC, Obscene Alex.  The NHL is back this week with one outdoor game, one indoor-outdoor game (it’s house-trained), and a big trade – and not a moment too soon because the withdrawal was making my hands shake.  Here’s what happened this past week:

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Great Game Previews In History: 27 February 2014

by J.R.

Today in History

471px-Henry_IV_en_Herculeus_terrassant_l_Hydre_de_Lerne_cad_La_ligue_Catholique_Atelier_Toussaint_Dubreuil_circa_1600Henry of Navarre is crowned as Henry IV of France on February 27, 1594, ending an ordeal that began when Henry III was assassinated by a crazed monk.

Initially, he was opposed by the Catholic League (for the obvious reason that he was a Protestant). While he was confined to the south of France, he was aided by his Protestant ally, Queen Elizabeth I. Meanwhile, his Catholic uncle was proclaimed King of France, which didn’t bother Henry too much, because he had his uncle taken prisoner and, in any event, the old man died. The League then pushed a series of Spanish candidates, which made the people of France suspicious that they were being duped by the League.

Eventually, Henry renounced his Protestantism — allegedly saying Paris vaut bien une messe (“Paris is well worth a mass”) — and earned the support of the vast majority of his subjects and, thus, leading to his coronation.

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DemocraThree: 10 February 2014

by J.R.

demo210

Every Friday (except this week obviously), bloggers from around The Heptarchy will update us on the news and notes from their teams (with that fancy header image courtesy of Mike D, updated anew this week, and like democracy itself, it’s a perpetual work-in-progress). Yes, we ripped this off from TRH’s Pacific War Room; no, we don’t care. And since we ripped it off, we’ll follow their lead and go in standings order.

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The [Redacted] Week in Review with Obscene Alex: Toilet Gunk Edition

by obscenealex

The color of the wax was pretty close to rust in this mess.

The color of the wax was pretty close to rust in this mess.

Howdy, [donkey trilbies], and welcome to this week’s edition of the [Redacted] Week in Review.  Good players that matter are in Sochi by now, trying to find functional toilets.  Lesser players are on break.  Without Conference III hockey to cover over the next week, I find myself somewhere in the middle – I just replaced a toilet at my house and Olympic hockey is unlikely to offer the same enjoyable opportunities to converse with opposing fans that the regular NHL schedule does.  As a quick note on both, though, the nasty old wax ring I pulled off when I removed my old toilet was about the same color as the Phoenix Coyote jerseys.  I only wish I had taken a picture for posterior posterity.

It seems like this week has crawled as slowly as watching a New Jersey Devils shot trying to cross the goal line.  Nate MacKinnon is still running away with the Calder scoring race, Winnipeg lost two out of three this week, and the Blackhawks are still wearing the Conference III Crown of [Fecal Matter].  Not everything is the same, though… here’s some new stuff to enjoy:

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Great Game Previews In History: 4 February 2014

by J.R.

Today in History

415px-Septimius_Severus_busto-Musei_CapitoliniRoman Emperor Septimius Severus dies on this day in 211.

Having traveled to Britain in an effort to conquer the Caledonians in 208, Severus and his army had pushed far into what is now Scotland before the native Caledonians revolted and, boy, did that tick off the emperor:

“Let no one escape sheer destruction, No one our hands, not even the babe in the womb of the mother, If it be male; let it nevertheless not escape sheer destruction.”

Alas, Severus fell ill in the midst of the long campaign and retired to Eboracum (now York), where he died, telling his sons:

“Be harmonious, enrich the soldiers, and scorn all other men”

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