III Communication

Covering The NHL's Conference III Better Than Anyone On The Whole Internet. Like Ma Bell, We Got The III Communication

Tag: Claude Noel

Great Game Previews In History: 12 December 2013

by J.R.

Today In History

On December 12, 1098, Crusaders led by Raymond de Saint Gilles and Bohemond of Taranto negotiated the surrender of the city of Ma’aara in what is now Syria. The city had been under siege for two weeks.

Upon the surrender of the townspeople, the Crusaders immediately began a slaughter (that’s like fighting someone who doesn’t want to fight, Ray Emery).

But alas, those silly Crusaders took a city that wasn’t nearly as rich as they thought. While some negotiations were going on, the soldiers had to wait in this desolate Detroit of the Desert and eventually started eating dead people, leading historian Albert of Aix to say “Nam Christiani non solum Turcos vel Sarracenos occisos, verum etiam canes arreptos” (“the Christians did not shrink from eating not only killed Turks or Saracens, but even dogs”).

Even dogs, you guys. Even dogs.

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Quarter Life Crisis

by J.R.

Last night, at the conclusion of the Minnesota-Montreal game, 25 percent of the Conference III schedule was complete (yes, I did the math).

This is a traditional time of examination for NHL teams and with just one game on the Conference III slate tonight, the schedule affords a good place to take a breather and see what’s happened through the season’s first quarter.

Thanks to everyone who commented and emailed.

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IIIiteracy: Threeros Great And Small!

by J.R.

Today the Winnipeg Jets — the minnows of Conference III — hosted the Detroit Red Wings, the yellow-bellied retreaters of the Flortheast.

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Thursday Thirteen: Polter-thriced

by J.R.

Every Thursday we bring you the III Communication’s Conference III Power Rankings, the Thursday Thirteen.

This week, it’s scary as heck!

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Great Game Previews In History: 27 October 2013

by J.R.

Today In History

constantine-cross-sky-christusrex-300hIn one of the most famous changes of heart  in human history, Constantine The Great looked up in the sky on the evening of October 27, 312, and had his Vision of the Cross the night before what would be known as the Battle of the Milvian Bridge, the key battle in the wars q1 g2`1q.

In the vision, he was commanded to “delineate the heavenly sign on the shields of his soldiers,” commonly believed to be the labarum, or Chi-Rho cross.

Constantine, the story goes, saw the words In hoc signo vinces — “In this sign, you shall conquer.”

And so he did.

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Great Game Previews In History: 24 October 2013

by J.R.

wallstreet-crashToday In History

Everybody talks about Black Tuesday — Oct. 29, 1929 — as the big moment in the Stock Market Crash of 1929, precipitating the Great Depression.

But the trouble really started on Oct. 24, 1929 — Black Thursday — when the market lost 11 percent of its value at the opening bell (and really, it started with the hemming and hawing on Smoot-Hawley and with the arrest of some leading banking types over in London, which experienced its own crash in late September).

Some leading financiers rehashed a strategy that helped things during the Panic of 1907 — conspicuously buying up blue chip stocks at a price well above their current value; imagine this scene today: Warren Buffett himself literally on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange paying way too much for, say, Apple or Google. This is basically what happened. It worked. Briefly.

The rest, as they say…

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IIIiteracy: 18 October 2013

by J.R.

A recap of tonight’s Conference III action with help from the geniuses on social media:

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Great Game Previews In History: 18 October 2013

by J.R.

Today In History:

800px-USS_Wasp_capturing_HMS_FrolicThere were lots of weird naval engagements during the War of 1812, mostly because a bunch of them took place on the Great Lakes and fighting a naval battle without sea room is a little like trying to get through the neutral zone on a vintage era New Jersey Devils team.

The battle in question on October 18, 1812, though, took place on the Atlantic, about 300 miles north of Bermuda.

The HMS Frolic was escorting a group of 14 merchant ships out of Honduras, but the convoy was scattered. Meanwhile, the USS Wasp — patrolling between the Delaware River and the West Indies, came upon the Frolic.

At 11:30, the battle was joined. The Frolic was outgunned by the Wasp; the latter attacked the Frolic’s hull, while the Frolic — in opposition to the usual British strategy — aimed high. The Wasp defeated the Frolic, all 90 of the latter’s officers and crew either injured or dead. It was all over by 11:52.

But then it gets weird: as the Wasp crew tried to repair the Frolic, the HMS Poictiers stumbled upon the action and captured both ships.

Though a lot of what happened in the War of 1812 is disputed as to victors and losers, this one, actually, goes down as an American win.

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Hello Mudduh, Hello Fadduh: Conference III Camp Report, 16 September 2013

by J.R.

hmhf45aAs camps continue in Conference III, we’ll do a daily check-in on what’s happening across The Heptarchy. Most of the time, frankly, this is going to be by Twitter search or maybe Google if we are feeling especially inspired. Sometimes the Nashville report may be done in person. We’ll see if our buddy Gord Stinkhole wants to check in from Winnipeg. And if any of y’all have any insights from a camp visit, fire ‘em to conferencethree[at]gmail[dot]com. We’ll totally rip off your content.

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Happy Hour In The Heptarchy: Red Gatorade & Fig Newtons

by J.R.

It’s five past 5 across Conference III (leave work early, Colorado — you have our permission), time to hit bricks and get that freakin’ weekend started, am I right?

Of course I am.

It’s been a tough week for some of you so loosen your belt, pop a top, grab a spoon and stop being such a sourpuss. III Communication’s got good news for everybody.

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