III Communication

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Tag: Columbus Blue Jackets

Great Game Previews In History: 16 October 2015

by J.R.

Today In History

What is known in English as the Battle of Leipzig — much more poetically, the Germans call it Völkerschlacht and the French Bataille des Nations — begins October 16, 1813 as the forces of the Sixth Coalition meet those of Napoleon near the city in Saxony.

It was to be the largest battle in Europe until World War I with some 600,000 belligerents in the field. On the Coalition side: Russians, Prussians, Austrians and Sweden. For Napoleon, not just French but Saxon, Polish and Italian troops.

Furthermore, each of the Coalition countries had, present in the field, their monarchs: Tsar Alexander I of Russia, Prussia’s Frederick William III and Emperor Francis I of Austria. This led to massive staffs and, one might call them “predictable” petty rivalries within the Coalition itself, already strained upon having lost the contributions of British and Portuguese forces (among others).

Nevertheless, all agreed that Napoleon’s German campaign had to be stopped and Leipzig was where they could make that happen.

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Great Game Previews In History: 14 October 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

Minutes before giving a campaign speech in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Teddy Roosevelt is shot on October 14, 1912.

The would-be assassin is New York saloon owner John Flammang Schrank. Schrank said he made the attempt because he opposed presidents seeking a third term (can you imagine being so goosed about term limits that you’d try to shoot somebody?) and that he was advised by the ghost of William McKinley to take action (it will not surprise you to learn Schrank was committed and died in a mental hospital in 1943).

In any event, Roosevelt was not killed. Schrank’s bullet hit his eyeglasses case, the 50-page speech he was set to give and lodged in his chest, but Roosevelt, being something of an amateur anatomist (as one is), knew the bullet hadn’t entered his lung because he wasn’t coughing blood, so he gave the speech anyway.

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No, Listen, It’s Barry Trotz as Joan Crawford and Stinger as Bette Davis

by J.R.

My irrational hatred of the definitely not Conference III Columbus Blue Jackets bears fruit at Puck Daddy.

III Communication’s Official Guaranteed To Be Right Playoff Predictions

by obscenealex

Obscene Alex and J.R. can’t agree on the utility of explicit language; can they agree on the outcome of this year’s playoff series?

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Thursday Thirteen: This Is The End

by J.R.

Every Thursday we bring you III Communication’s Conference III Power Rankings, the Thursday Thirteen.

This week, the last fake rankings of the year.

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Great Game Previews In History: 9 April 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

On April 9, 1388, forces of the Old Swiss Confederation defeated those of the Habsburgian Archduchy of Austria at the Battle of Näfels.

In the spring of 1387, the Canton of Glarus destroyed a Habsburg-held town and then declared themselves free of the control of the be-jawed nobles.

The next year, the Austrians attacked in an attempt to cut Glarus off from their Swiss Eidgenossen. A combined force of 6,500 attacked the garrison at Näfels, defended by just 400.

And wouldn’t ya know it — the Swiss won.

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DemocraThree: 4 April 2014

by J.R.

demo210

Every Friday bloggers from around The Heptarchy will update us on the news and notes from their teams (with that fancy header image courtesy of Mike D; like democracy itself, it’s a perpetual work-in-progress). Yes, we ripped this off from TRH’s Pacific War Room; no, we don’t care. And since we ripped it off, we’ll follow their lead and go in standings order.

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Great Game Previews In History: 4 April 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

Great_Fire_of_Cottenham_DamageA fire spreads through the Cambridgeshire village of Cottenham beginning the evening of April 4, 1850.

Dozens of cottages burnt down as well as the oppositionally-named Black Horse and White Horse inns, along with the Wesleyan Chapel which was housed in a barn.

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Great Game Previews In History: 1 April 2014

by J.R.

Today in History

The Recapture of Bahia begins on April 1, 1625 as a combined Spanish and Portuguese force made an effort to take back the Brazilian port town of Salvador da Bahia from the Dutch during the Eighty Years War (these countries, incredibly, were world powers in the 17th century and boy does that seem weird).

In May 1624, Dutch West Indies Company forces commanded by Jacob Willekens captured Bahia from the Portuguese. Philip IV, king of Spain and Portugal, ordered a Spanish-Portuguese fleet set sail with the objective of recovering the city. Sailing from the port of Lisbon under the command of Fadrique Álvarez de Toledo y Mendoza, the fleet crossed the Atlantic.

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Great Game Previews In History: 15 March 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

1311+Battle+of+HalmyrosIn 1311, the mercenaries of the Catalan Company defeated those of the Frankish-Greek Duke of Athens, Walter V of Brienne at the Battle of Halmyros.

Walter sowed the seeds of his own destruction here: he invited the Catalan Company into his duchy in order to defend it against its bellicose neighbors. Then he attempted to pay a portion of the company lavishly and send the rest away with no pay. That was unacceptable.

The almogavars rained their javelins down on Walter’s knights and then charged the field, cutting them down as they went. Meanwhile, Turks — who had waited tentatively on the sideline because they thought the battle was a pretext to destroy them — ran roughshod over the remaining allies of Walter’s, of whom there were almost none.

The Catalan Company was the new leader of the Duchy of Athens.

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