III Communication

Covering The NHL's Conference III Better Than Anyone On The Whole Internet. Like Ma Bell, We Got The III Communication

Tag: Los Angeles Kings

Great Game Previews In History: 16 October 2015

by J.R.

Today In History

What is known in English as the Battle of Leipzig — much more poetically, the Germans call it Völkerschlacht and the French Bataille des Nations — begins October 16, 1813 as the forces of the Sixth Coalition meet those of Napoleon near the city in Saxony.

It was to be the largest battle in Europe until World War I with some 600,000 belligerents in the field. On the Coalition side: Russians, Prussians, Austrians and Sweden. For Napoleon, not just French but Saxon, Polish and Italian troops.

Furthermore, each of the Coalition countries had, present in the field, their monarchs: Tsar Alexander I of Russia, Prussia’s Frederick William III and Emperor Francis I of Austria. This led to massive staffs and, one might call them “predictable” petty rivalries within the Coalition itself, already strained upon having lost the contributions of British and Portuguese forces (among others).

Nevertheless, all agreed that Napoleon’s German campaign had to be stopped and Leipzig was where they could make that happen.

Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

Great Game Previews In History: 12 October 2014

by J.R.

Today in History

The forces of Edwin of Northumbria — at the time the most powerful of the petty kings in England — are defeated on this day in 633 by an alliance of Mercia and Gwynedd at the Battle of Hatfield Chase in what is now south Yorkshire.

A few years earlier, Edwin had defeated Gwynedd’s leader, Cadwallon, and driven him to a small island off Anglesey. Cadwallon, after biding his time, drove the Northumbrians from his territory and then united with Penda of Mercia and gave chase, eventually joining the battle with the Northumbrians at Hatfield Chase.

Read the rest of this entry »

Playoff Predictions: Round 2

by obscenealex

Obscene Alex and J.R. went five for eight in Round 1. It almost has to improve in Round 2! Series previews for Hawks/Wild will be up whatever day that begins (Friday?).

Read the rest of this entry »

III Communication’s Official Guaranteed To Be Right Playoff Predictions

by obscenealex

Obscene Alex and J.R. can’t agree on the utility of explicit language; can they agree on the outcome of this year’s playoff series?

Read the rest of this entry »

Great Game Previews In History: 31 March 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

On this date in 1146, with King Louis VII alongside, French Cistercian abbot Bernard of Clairvaux takes to the podium in a field at Vézelay and gave a speech which inspired the Second Crusade.

O ye who listen to me! Hasten to appease the anger of heaven, but no longer implore its goodness by vain complaints. Clothe yourselves in sackcloth, but also cover yourselves with your impenetrable bucklers. The din of arms, the danger, the labors, the fatigues of war, are the penances that God now imposes upon you. Hasten then to expiate your sins by victories over the Infidels, and let the deliverance of the holy places be the reward of your repentance.”

The assembled responded with that French call of old: “Deus vult!” and Bernard shouted back “Cursed be he who does not stain his sword with blood.”

No pressure.

Read the rest of this entry »

DemocraThree: 7 March 2014

by J.R.

demomk2

Every Friday (except this week obviously) [Ed note: I’m an idiot] bloggers from around The Heptarchy will update us on the news and notes from their teams (with that fancy header image courtesy of Mike D; like democracy itself, it’s a perpetual work-in-progress). Yes, we ripped this off from TRH’s Pacific War Room; no, we don’t care. And since we ripped it off, we’ll follow their lead and go in standings order.

Read the rest of this entry »

Great Game Previews In History: 6 March 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

800px-1854_AlamoThe 13-day siege of the Alamo ends when, in the early morning of March 6, 1836, the Mexican Army advanced on the former mission.

The defending “Texians,” as they were then known, were able to beat back two attacks, but failed when the Mexicans attacked a third time.

Many of the defenders retreated to interior buildings. Those unable to do so were quickly dispatched by the cavalry. A handful attempted to surrender but were executed. Somewhere between 182 and 257 Texians died and roughly 600 of the Mexican attackers were either killed or wounded.

The defeat prompted a recruiting boom for the Texian army and is a pivotal point in Texas’ fight for independence.

Read the rest of this entry »

The [Redacted] Week in Review: It’s Otter Time

by obscenealex

Welcome to the [Redacted] Week in Review – I’m your HMFIC, Obscene Alex.  The NHL is back this week with one outdoor game, one indoor-outdoor game (it’s house-trained), and a big trade – and not a moment too soon because the withdrawal was making my hands shake.  Here’s what happened this past week:

Read the rest of this entry »

Great Game Previews In History: 26 February 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

napoleon_elbaNapoleon escapes from the island of Elba off the Tuscan coast.

Sent to exile there as a condition of the Treaty of Fontainebleau — he was allowed to keep his title of “Emperor” and was the ruler of Elba, which was carved out as a separate principality, which means treaty-making was a different animal in 1815 and deposed dictators were treated a lot better than they are now — Napoleon was unhappy being separated from his wife and son (who were sent to Austria) and was not receiving the allowance he was guaranteed by the treaty (seriously, all those dictators who got hanged by their toes must look at Napoleon-on-Elba and just shake their heads). Further, he had heard rumors he was going to be sent to a remote island in the Atlantic (which, of course, he was, eventually).

Thus, he stole away while the guard ships were away, wisely timing his escape so he’d land in France as prisoners of the Napoleonic War were returning from their captors’ countries, thus providing him with an ever-growing army. And thus began the Hundred Days.

Read the rest of this entry »

DemocraThree: 10 February 2014

by J.R.

demo210

Every Friday (except this week obviously), bloggers from around The Heptarchy will update us on the news and notes from their teams (with that fancy header image courtesy of Mike D, updated anew this week, and like democracy itself, it’s a perpetual work-in-progress). Yes, we ripped this off from TRH’s Pacific War Room; no, we don’t care. And since we ripped it off, we’ll follow their lead and go in standings order.

Read the rest of this entry »