III Communication

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Tag: New Jersey Devils

Great Game Previews In History: 24 October 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

Perhaps the most important treaty in human history is signed as the concept of the modern nation-state is born with the signing of the final bits of the Peace of Westphalia October 24, 1648.

Coming at the end of a massive diplomatic congress — delegations were sent from 16 European states, 66 states of the Holy Roman Empire (which represented 140 total Imperial states), and 27 interest groups representing 38 interest groups — the three treaties of Westphalia ostensibly ended the Thirty Years War between the Protestants and Catholics in the Holy Roman Empire and the Eighty Years War between Spain and the Dutch.

What it, in fact, did was create the modern notion of sovereignty, a primary export of Western Europe for the ensuing 300 years.

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Great Game Previews In History: 20 March 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

220px-Familjen_Gustaf_Axelsson_BanérOn March 20, 1600, another chapter in “The Swedes: Not As Nice As You Thought,” the time featuring the Linköping Bloodbath.

Sigismund III Vasa, the Polish king who was also the King of Sweden, went against his promise that he would not aid the Catholic cause in Sweden while being king of same. This sparked a civil war, with the other side led by Duke Charles (later Charles IX of Sweden), who was also Sigismund’s uncle. The Protestant forces deposed Sigismund and part of the truce was that he would turn over his Catholic privy counselors.

And then it all broke off.

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DemocraThree: 14 March 2014

by J.R.

demo210

Every Friday bloggers from around The Heptarchy will update us on the news and notes from their teams (with that fancy header image courtesy of Mike D; like democracy itself, it’s a perpetual work-in-progress). Yes, we ripped this off from TRH’s Pacific War Room; no, we don’t care. And since we ripped it off, we’ll follow their lead and go in standings order.

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DemocraThree: 10 February 2014

by J.R.

demo210

Every Friday (except this week obviously), bloggers from around The Heptarchy will update us on the news and notes from their teams (with that fancy header image courtesy of Mike D, updated anew this week, and like democracy itself, it’s a perpetual work-in-progress). Yes, we ripped this off from TRH’s Pacific War Room; no, we don’t care. And since we ripped it off, we’ll follow their lead and go in standings order.

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The [Redacted] Week in Review with Obscene Alex: Toilet Gunk Edition

by obscenealex

The color of the wax was pretty close to rust in this mess.

The color of the wax was pretty close to rust in this mess.

Howdy, [donkey trilbies], and welcome to this week’s edition of the [Redacted] Week in Review.  Good players that matter are in Sochi by now, trying to find functional toilets.  Lesser players are on break.  Without Conference III hockey to cover over the next week, I find myself somewhere in the middle – I just replaced a toilet at my house and Olympic hockey is unlikely to offer the same enjoyable opportunities to converse with opposing fans that the regular NHL schedule does.  As a quick note on both, though, the nasty old wax ring I pulled off when I removed my old toilet was about the same color as the Phoenix Coyote jerseys.  I only wish I had taken a picture for posterior posterity.

It seems like this week has crawled as slowly as watching a New Jersey Devils shot trying to cross the goal line.  Nate MacKinnon is still running away with the Calder scoring race, Winnipeg lost two out of three this week, and the Blackhawks are still wearing the Conference III Crown of [Fecal Matter].  Not everything is the same, though… here’s some new stuff to enjoy:

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Great Game Previews In History: 3 February 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

800px-Flora's_Malle-wagen_van_Hendrik_Pot_1640“Tulip mania” ends on this day in 1637 as the market for the suddenly and incredibly popular flower collapses, essentially in a single day, with dealers unable to find any buyers.

Tulips are still hot in The Netherlands, but not even close to the way it was in 1636 and 1637. Newly introduced via trade from Turkey, the beautiful plants became Europe’s go-to status symbol. Especially in demand were “broken” tulips — flowers infected with a virus that creates vivid and unique color patterns. But infected plants grow slowly and can’t really be propagated beyond the initial plant and three or four “daughters.” Further, tulips — even normal tulips — take at least seven years to grow. Thus, a futures market was created.

Speculators entered the market — fueled by French demand — and at its peak, 40 bulbs of the Viceroy tulip were fetching 100,000 florin (by way of comparison, the average wage at the time was 300 florin annually).

Bulbs — all unseen and some not even cultivated yet — were trading 10 and 12 times a day until suddenly, people stopped showing up to the auctions and a drastic market correction followed.

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DemocraThree: 31 January 2014

by J.R.

demomk2

Every Friday, bloggers from around The Heptarchy will update us on the news and notes from their teams (with that fancy header image courtesy of Mike D, updated anew this week, and like democracy itself, it’s a perpetual work-in-progress). Yes, we ripped this off from TRH’s Pacific War Room; no, we don’t care. And since we ripped it off, we’ll follow their lead and go in standings order.

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Great Game Previews In History: 31 January 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

472px-Explorer_1_conferenceExplorer I, the first American satellite (and the third overall after a pair of Sputniks), rides to space atop a Juno I rocket, on this day in 1958.

It was the beginning of the successful U.S. space program and, ergo, the beginning of the Cold War Space Race.

It stayed under power for 136 days and in orbit until 1970 making more than 58,000 orbits.

Hers was a scientific mission — part of the International Geophysical Year — but there’s no doubt there was a little of “oh hey Russia we can do that, too (finally!)” involved too. After all, the U.S. trotted out Wernher von Braun at the press conference (as pictured). That’s a little bit of a how-do-you-do to the Soviets.

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Great Game Previews In History: 30 January 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

743px-Execution_of_Cromwell,_Bradshaw_and_Ireton,_1661On January 30, 1661 — two years after his death and 12 years after the execution of Charles I — Oliver Cromwell was exhumed from Westminster Abbey and he was executed even though he was dead:

…the shrouded bodies in open coffins were dragged on a sledge through the streets of London to the gallows, where each body was hanged in full public view until around four o’clock that afternoon. After being taken down, Cromwell’s head was severed with eight blows, placed on a wooden spike on a 20-foot (6.1 m) pole, and raised above Westminster Hall.

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Great Game Previews In History: 28 January 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

800px-Le_Bal_des_ArdentsOn this day in 1393, Charles VI of France hosted what would be known to history as the Bal des Ardents. Our French-speaking friends know that means “The Ball of the Burning Men,” which may be the most Conference III name for a party ever.

Charles became king on the death of his father, Charles V, at just the age of 12. Now 15, the party was intended to raise his spirits, one of many events planned to raise the spirits of Young Chuck, who had a bit of a spell the summer before.

Officially, the ball was to celebrate the third marriage of one of the ladies-in-waiting of Charles’ wife and, in the 14th century, remarriages of widows were often occasions for tomfoolery.

But this one went horribly awry.

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