III Communication

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Tag: New York Islanders

DemocraThree: 24 January 2013

by J.R.

demothree

Every Friday, bloggers from around The Heptarchy will update us on the news and notes from their teams (with that fancy header image courtesy of Mike D and like democracy itself, it’s a perpetual work-in-progress). Yes, we ripped this off from TRH’s Pacific War Room; no, we don’t care. And since we ripped it off, we’ll follow their lead and go in standings order.

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DemocraThree: 17 January 2014

by J.R.

demothree

Today, we debut a new weekly feature here at III Communication — DemocraThree. Every Friday, bloggers from around The Heptarchy will update us on the news and notes from their teams (with that fancy header image courtesy of Mike D and like democracy itself, it’s a perpetual work-in-progress). Yes, we ripped this off from TRH’s Pacific War Room; no, we don’t care. And since we ripped it off, we’ll follow their lead and go in standings order.

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Great Game Previews In History: 10 January 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

450px-Rimini088In 49 BC, Julius Caesar takes his Legio XIII Gemina across the Rubicon River, essentially starting a civil war and famously saying “Alea iacta est” — “the die has been cast.”

Commanders were not allowed to lead their armies out of the northern Cisalpine Gaul provinces into y proper in the south, a proscription made by the Senate ostensibly to prevent a coup d’etat.

Caesar knew what he was doing. His actions kickstarted the civil war between his supporters — the Populares— and those of the Senate and Pompey, the more conservative and traditionalist set.

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Great Game Previews In History: 6 January 2013

by J.R.

Today In History

800px-South_Sea_BubbleThe Committee of Inquiry on the South Sea Bubble published its findings in 1721.

In 1711, the South Sea Company was given a Parliamentary monopoly on English trade to South America, which didn’t matter because England was fighting the War of Spanish Succession at the time and Spain controlled South America.

To make money, therefore, the South Sea Company took on national debt and sold shares of stock. And by sold, I mean, “gave away to powerful people and then used the fact that powerful people ‘bought’ stock to sell stock to normal people, thus inflating its price, leading to a precipitous bubble burst and causing serious detriment to the British economy.”

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Great Game Previews In History: 2 January 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

At the French Academy of Sciences on January 2, 1860, the discovery of a planet — Vulcan — was announced.

It was claimed to exist between the orbit of Mercury and the Sun, with numerous mid-19th century astronomers claimed to have seen a black disc transit the sun. Urbain La Verrier became convinced of Vulcan’s existence after hearing the testimony of a country doctor and amateur astronomer Edmond Modeste Lescarbault, who timed this planet’s transit using a pendulum and a pocket watch.

Scientists were convinced of Vulcan’s existence due to anomalies in Mercury’s motion. Later, said anomalies would be explained using Einstein’s general theory of relativity.

Today, few, if any, credible astronomers are convinced of the veracity of Vulcan and it has passed into the realm of the handful of proposed or hypothetical planets.

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Conference III Championship Belt Tale of the Tape: St. Louis at Dallas, 29 December 2013

by J.R.

It took a shootout to do it, but St. Louis won the Conference III Belt from Chicago Saturday night in a 6-5 classic, setting up the third belt match in three days after the Christmas break as the Blues travel to defend their title in Dallas, still looking for their first run with the strap.

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Great Game Previews In History: Get Boozy on Repeal Day

by J.R.

Today In History

prohibition_ends_repeal_day_cocktailsEighty years ago today, three states — Pennsylvania, Ohio and Utah — approved the 21st Amendment to the Constitution, repealing the 18th Amendment and, ergo, Prohibition.

“What America needs now is a drink,” President Roosevelt famously declared, as if America hadn’t been drinking all along during the 13 years of allegedly booze-free America, hooch being readily available and people being willing to ignore the law.

It’s interesting that Utah gets the credit as the final state needed to ratify the 21st, since two states with far more influence and far bigger footprints did the same contemporaneously. Utah is likely remembered as the turning-point state because it makes for a more interesting story that a state which, to this day, places bizarre restrictions on the sale of alcohol is, in fact, the one that made it legal to drink again.

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Great Game Previews In History: 27 November 2013

by J.R.

clovisToday In History

King Clovis I of the Franks dies November 27, 511.

Though he managed to unite much of what was now France under one ruler, his kingdom was divided among his four sons: Theuderic, Chlodomer, Childebert and Clotaire.

Why would anybody go through all the trouble of uniting something just to divide it? Maybe he didn’t care because he was dead.

In any event, the Merovingians managed to rule France for another 200 years, but the constant splitting  of the kingdom didn’t really work out to create a stable situation and eventually the Merovingians gave way to the Carolingians of Charlemagne fame.

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IIIiteracy: Jets Beat Wings! Preds Delete Things! Avs Brought Down! Blues Wear Frown!

by J.R.

Tonight’s Conference III action is good news, bad news, bad news, bad news.

First the good news:

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Great Game Previews In History: 12 November 2013

by J.R.

Today In History

On November 2, 1970, the Oregon Highway Division found itself with a 45-foot, eight-ton problem.

A sperm whale beached itself at Florence on the central Oregon coast. The Highway Division fellows, being Highway Division fellows, decided to remove this whale the same way they removed boulders: with a half-ton of dynamite.

And that’s not an exaggeration. They used literally a half-ton. Twenty cases of dynamite. The hope was that the smithereens would be smithered so reen that birds would take care of the rest.

And thus, a video was born:

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