III Communication

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Tag: Phoenix Coyotes

Great Game Previews In History: 28 February 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

600px-Founders_of_the_Baltimore_and_Ohio_RailroadThe city of Baltimore charters the B&O Railroad on February 28, 1827.

It was simply a matter of keeping up with the Joneses: for years Baltimore had an advantage over other major American seaports (New York, Philadelphia and Charleston, for example) because it was farther inland and therefore closer to the rest of the country. But the opening of the Erie Canal connected New York with the inland, as did the series of canals built by Pennsylvania connecting Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. The city fathers in Charm City mandated the railroad they chartered connect to a suitable point on the Ohio River.

And so it did, becoming the first common-carrier of freight and passengers in the USA.

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Great Game Previews In History: 27 February 2014

by J.R.

Today in History

471px-Henry_IV_en_Herculeus_terrassant_l_Hydre_de_Lerne_cad_La_ligue_Catholique_Atelier_Toussaint_Dubreuil_circa_1600Henry of Navarre is crowned as Henry IV of France on February 27, 1594, ending an ordeal that began when Henry III was assassinated by a crazed monk.

Initially, he was opposed by the Catholic League (for the obvious reason that he was a Protestant). While he was confined to the south of France, he was aided by his Protestant ally, Queen Elizabeth I. Meanwhile, his Catholic uncle was proclaimed King of France, which didn’t bother Henry too much, because he had his uncle taken prisoner and, in any event, the old man died. The League then pushed a series of Spanish candidates, which made the people of France suspicious that they were being duped by the League.

Eventually, Henry renounced his Protestantism — allegedly saying Paris vaut bien une messe (“Paris is well worth a mass”) — and earned the support of the vast majority of his subjects and, thus, leading to his coronation.

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DemocraThree: 10 February 2014

by J.R.

demo210

Every Friday (except this week obviously), bloggers from around The Heptarchy will update us on the news and notes from their teams (with that fancy header image courtesy of Mike D, updated anew this week, and like democracy itself, it’s a perpetual work-in-progress). Yes, we ripped this off from TRH’s Pacific War Room; no, we don’t care. And since we ripped it off, we’ll follow their lead and go in standings order.

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The [Redacted] Week in Review with Obscene Alex: Toilet Gunk Edition

by obscenealex

The color of the wax was pretty close to rust in this mess.

The color of the wax was pretty close to rust in this mess.

Howdy, [donkey trilbies], and welcome to this week’s edition of the [Redacted] Week in Review.  Good players that matter are in Sochi by now, trying to find functional toilets.  Lesser players are on break.  Without Conference III hockey to cover over the next week, I find myself somewhere in the middle – I just replaced a toilet at my house and Olympic hockey is unlikely to offer the same enjoyable opportunities to converse with opposing fans that the regular NHL schedule does.  As a quick note on both, though, the nasty old wax ring I pulled off when I removed my old toilet was about the same color as the Phoenix Coyote jerseys.  I only wish I had taken a picture for posterior posterity.

It seems like this week has crawled as slowly as watching a New Jersey Devils shot trying to cross the goal line.  Nate MacKinnon is still running away with the Calder scoring race, Winnipeg lost two out of three this week, and the Blackhawks are still wearing the Conference III Crown of [Fecal Matter].  Not everything is the same, though… here’s some new stuff to enjoy:

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Great Game Previews in History: 8 February 2014

by J.R.

Today in History

_65729396_shergar_getty304In 1983, Irish racehorse Shergar disappears — much as the NHL season will briefly disappear today — seized not by the patriotic fervor the Olympic endears, but by armed gunmen who almost certainly (though not definitely) were members of the Provisional Irish Republican Army attempting to extort the horse’s ownership syndicate — including various Astors and the Aga Khan IV — for money to purchase arms.

Shergar was, perhaps, the most famous racehorse in the world in 1983, having won the Irish Derby and King George in 1981, retiring with a record of 6-1 and remaining in Ireland to stand stud, an unexpected move. But then he was stolen and never seen again.

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Great Game Previews In History: 7 February 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

251px-Devonshire_Devil_Prints_1855On this day in 1855, a series of hoof-like marks — now called “The Devil’s Footprints” — appeared in the snow in South Devon. These footprints, most of which measured around four inches long, three inches across, between eight and sixteen inches apart and mostly in a single file, were reported from over thirty locations across Devon and a couple in Dorset. It was estimated that the total distance of the tracks amounted to between 40 and 100 miles. Houses, rivers, haystacks and other obstacles were traveled straight over, and footprints appeared on the tops of snow-covered roofs and high walls which lay in the footprints’ path, as well as leading up to and exiting various drain pipes as small as four inches in diameter.

From a contemporaneous news report:

“It appears on Thursday night last, there was a very heavy snowfall in the neighbourhood of Exeter and the South of Devon. On the following morning the inhabitants of the above towns were surprised at discovering the footmarks of some strange and mysterious animal endowed with the power of ubiquity, as the footprints were to be seen in all kinds of unaccountable places – on the tops of houses and narrow walls, in gardens and court-yards, enclosed by high walls and pailings, as well in open fields.”

Numerous theories have been developed to their genesis: a balloon dragging a chain, hopping mice, an escaped kangaroo, badgers and mass hysteria.

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Great Game Previews In History: 4 February 2014

by J.R.

Today in History

415px-Septimius_Severus_busto-Musei_CapitoliniRoman Emperor Septimius Severus dies on this day in 211.

Having traveled to Britain in an effort to conquer the Caledonians in 208, Severus and his army had pushed far into what is now Scotland before the native Caledonians revolted and, boy, did that tick off the emperor:

“Let no one escape sheer destruction, No one our hands, not even the babe in the womb of the mother, If it be male; let it nevertheless not escape sheer destruction.”

Alas, Severus fell ill in the midst of the long campaign and retired to Eboracum (now York), where he died, telling his sons:

“Be harmonious, enrich the soldiers, and scorn all other men”

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DemocraThree: 31 January 2014

by J.R.

demomk2

Every Friday, bloggers from around The Heptarchy will update us on the news and notes from their teams (with that fancy header image courtesy of Mike D, updated anew this week, and like democracy itself, it’s a perpetual work-in-progress). Yes, we ripped this off from TRH’s Pacific War Room; no, we don’t care. And since we ripped it off, we’ll follow their lead and go in standings order.

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DemocraThree: 17 January 2014

by J.R.

demothree

Today, we debut a new weekly feature here at III Communication — DemocraThree. Every Friday, bloggers from around The Heptarchy will update us on the news and notes from their teams (with that fancy header image courtesy of Mike D and like democracy itself, it’s a perpetual work-in-progress). Yes, we ripped this off from TRH’s Pacific War Room; no, we don’t care. And since we ripped it off, we’ll follow their lead and go in standings order.

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Great Game Previews in History: 14 January 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

Bodyline_3rd_Test_Oldfield_02In 1933, the controversial Bodyline Ashes between Australia and England — the Conference III-est cricket series of all time — culminated when Australia captain Bill Woodfull was struck on the heart by a lifting, short delivery and fell to the ground in his crease.

It doesn’t take a lot of cricket understanding to grasp the idea behind Bodyline, so here goes: Australia had some of the world’s most dangerous batsmen at the time, including Donald Bradman, perhaps the greatest batsman ever. In an effort to curtail the strong play from Down Under, England decided to have its fast bowlers bowl short (so the ball would bounce up into the batsmen’s bodies and head) and down the leg side (that is: towards their bodies). To make a baseball analogy, England had its fastest guys do nothing but brush back the batsmen. In addition, England set its field so that there were a number of fielders behind the batsmen on the leg side, effectively eliminating the only way to combat such a strategy, which is to try and tuck the ball behind (now, the Laws of Cricket only allow teams to put two fielders behind the batsmen on the leg side).

It was a brutal, brutal series (that England won, by the way) that changed cricket and the relations between England and her colony forever.

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