III Communication

Covering The NHL's Conference III Better Than Anyone On The Whole Internet. Like Ma Bell, We Got The III Communication

Tag: Ryan Kesler

[Redacted]: Catching Up

by obscenealex

If nothing else scares you today, this probably should.

If nothing else scares you today, this probably should.

Happy Halloween, you bunch of spooky dark [entrances to tunnels of terror].  It’s been too long!  I know.  I have so much [loving stink] going on in my professional and personal life that it’s been hard to carve out time for my normal in-season weekly forays into the ridiculous with you, you jovial [family men].  It’s good [positive developments], though, except for the part where it keeps me away from III Communication.

Here’s a quick wrap up of recent events around Conference III before I finish a 50+ slide powerpoint deck and head to the Halloween store to pick up this year’s costume…

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DemocraThree: 21 March 2014

by J.R.

demo210

Every Friday bloggers from around The Heptarchy will update us on the news and notes from their teams (with that fancy header image courtesy of Mike D; like democracy itself, it’s a perpetual work-in-progress). Yes, we ripped this off from TRH’s Pacific War Room; no, we don’t care. And since we ripped it off, we’ll follow their lead and go in standings order.

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Great Game Previews In History: 19 March 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

Cavelier_de_la_salleDuring an expedition to claim all the land in America between the Gulf of Mexico and Fort St. Louis — an expedition that left France with 320 people which dwindled to 36 — René-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, explorer of the Mississippi, was murdered.

The Belle, the last of the three ships remaining from those he had sailed from France, had run aground (just as its two sister ships had done earlier) and, for two years, La Salle’s group had been wandering around aimlessly searching for the Mississippi Delta. On March 19, 1687, Pierre Duhault and a companion hid in the grass. As La Salle passed by, Duhault shot him in the head. He was stripped of all his clothing and jewelry and left to die where he fell, somewhere near what is now Huntsville, Texas. René-Robert Cavelier de la Salle died one hour later.

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DemocraThree: 7 March 2014

by J.R.

demomk2

Every Friday (except this week obviously) [Ed note: I’m an idiot] bloggers from around The Heptarchy will update us on the news and notes from their teams (with that fancy header image courtesy of Mike D; like democracy itself, it’s a perpetual work-in-progress). Yes, we ripped this off from TRH’s Pacific War Room; no, we don’t care. And since we ripped it off, we’ll follow their lead and go in standings order.

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DemocraThree Special Trade Deadline Edition

by J.R.

demo210With the trade deadline looming, we’ve asked our usual cadre of bloggers from around The Heptarchy to give us some idea of what the hay is going on with each team. Yes, we ripped this off from TRH’s Pacific War Room; no, we don’t care. For our special trade deadline edition, we’ll go in alphabetical order:

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Great Game Previews In History: 28 February 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

600px-Founders_of_the_Baltimore_and_Ohio_RailroadThe city of Baltimore charters the B&O Railroad on February 28, 1827.

It was simply a matter of keeping up with the Joneses: for years Baltimore had an advantage over other major American seaports (New York, Philadelphia and Charleston, for example) because it was farther inland and therefore closer to the rest of the country. But the opening of the Erie Canal connected New York with the inland, as did the series of canals built by Pennsylvania connecting Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. The city fathers in Charm City mandated the railroad they chartered connect to a suitable point on the Ohio River.

And so it did, becoming the first common-carrier of freight and passengers in the USA.

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Great Game Previews In History: 29 January 2014

by J.R.

Today in History

an_lushan__military_leader_during_the_tang_dynasty446998c9b8159bbeb173In 757, Chinese Emperor and general An Lushan is assassinated by his favored eunuch Li Zhu’er at the behest of An’s first son, An Qingxu.

An Lushan had gone blind, developed full-body ulcers, and gotten angry (as anyone would if blinded and covered in ulcers) and was in the habit of executing those who angered him. Knowing he was close to the end, it was rumored he planned to name a younger son, An Qing’en, as his successor. Thus, An Qingxu, afraid his father would have him killed, conspired with the eunuch and a general, Yan Zhuang, to instead kill the emperor.

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DemocraThree: 24 January 2013

by J.R.

demothree

Every Friday, bloggers from around The Heptarchy will update us on the news and notes from their teams (with that fancy header image courtesy of Mike D and like democracy itself, it’s a perpetual work-in-progress). Yes, we ripped this off from TRH’s Pacific War Room; no, we don’t care. And since we ripped it off, we’ll follow their lead and go in standings order.

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Great Game Previews In History: 23 January 2014

by J.R.

Today In History

bounty-day-burning-bounty-10151009On this day in 1790, the HMS Bounty mutineers burn the ship in what is now called Bounty Bay at Pitcairn Island, an effort to prevent both detection of the ship and escape by the mutineers.

It sealed the fate of the mutineers, led by Fletcher Christian, who had rebelled against their captain, William Bligh, in part because they’d gotten a taste of the South Pacific and, by gosh, who can blame them if they didn’t want to go back to England after that? It was also necessary for this to be an arduous and difficult journey so it would be appropriate for a movie starring Marlon Brando some years later.

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Thursday Thirteen: We’ll Drink A Cup of Kindness Yet

by J.R.

Every Thursday we bring you III Communication’s Conference III Power Rankings, the Thursday Thirteen.

This week, we’re only looking forward.

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