III Communication

Covering The NHL's Conference III Better Than Anyone On The Whole Internet. Like Ma Bell, We Got The III Communication

Tag: Washington Capitals

Great Game Previews In History: 17 November 2013

by J.R.

Today In History

390px-Charles_XIV_John_as_Crown_Prince_of_Sweden_-_François_GérardOn this date in 1810, Sweden declared war on Britain, starting the most inconsequential battle since Saturday night’s Calgary-Edmonton game.

This was all during the Napoleonic Wars, which was a particularly complicated time in European history, and that’s saying something. In any event, until 1810, Sweden was allied with the British in the fight against Napoleon. But Sweden was defeated by Russia in the Finnish War, precipitating the signing of the Treaty of Paris of 1810 (bear in mind that Russia, too, was part of the anti-France coalitions until her defeat at the Battle of Friedland.

OK, in any event, Russia beat Sweden in the Finnish War and forced Sweden to join the Continental System, which was Napoleon’s blockade of Britain. That was a big problem for Sweden, at least on its face, because there were a bunch of British ships trading in Swedish ports.

In any event, Sweden actually let British ships stay in their harbors and the two countries never actually fought each other. Peace was concluded in 1812.

Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

Great Game Previews In History: 10 November 2013

by J.R.

Today In History

Cumbre_Iberoamericana_2007During the 2007 Ibero-American Summit in Santiago, Chile, Hugo Chavez kept interrupting Spain’s prime minister, José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero. Eventually His Majesty Juan Carlos the First, By the Grace of God, the King of Spain, King of Castile, of León, of Aragon, of the Two Sicilies, of Jerusalem, of Navarre, of Granada, of Seville, of Toledo, of Valencia, of Galicia, of Sardinia, of Córdoba, of Corsica, of Murcia, of Jaén, of the Algarves, of Algeciras, of the Canary Islands, of the East and West Indies, of the Islands and Mainland of the Ocean Sea; Archduke of Austria; Duke of Burgundy, of Brabant, of Milan, of Athens and Neopatria; Count of Habsburg, of Flanders, of Tyrol, of Roussillon, and of Barcelona; Lord of Biscay and of Molina de Aragón; Captain General and Supreme Commander of the Royal Armed Forces; Sovereign Grand Master of the Order of the Golden Fleece and of the orders awarded by the Spanish state, got fed up and said:

¿Por qué no te callas?

More or less, “Why don’t you just shut up?” Baller.

Read the rest of this entry »

Great Game Previews In History: 7 November 2013

by J.R.

Today In History

p5874_ca6c53d0d12c08d4ebc4bb8adb461b32ensisheim_klOn November 7, 1492, a meteorite fell into a wheat field outside of Ensisheim in Alsace, then part of something called Further Austria (opening for Arcade Fire on select U.S. dates) but now in France.

Ensisheim is notable as the earliest meteorite for which we have a known date of impact and a preserved sample large enough for study.

Being the 15th century and See of Rome being held by a Spaniard — Alexander VI, known pre-papally as Rodrigo Borgia — many observers, notably the chronicler Sigismondo Tizio, saw the meteorite as a signal of coming doom. Of course, it helped that Tizio didn’t write his account until well after the meteorite struck, so it was relatively easy for him to point to the rise of syphilis and the invasion of Italy by France as portended by it.

Parts of the stone were sent to King Maximilian — later Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor — and to Cardinal Picolimini, who would become Pope Pius III.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Metropolitan Division is Stupid and Ugly and Dumb

by J.R.

tenby-mystery-beast-1-510x600-1361996047The NHL’s Metropolitan Division is a complete wasteland, devoid of any meaning or usefulness.

It is a hotbed of sin and horror. It is where good hockey withers away like a collapsing factory in a service-based economy — or like a service-based economy in a world of consumerism. It is so bad that all economic metaphors apply to it equally, even ones that are complete opposites.

It’s so bad it’s awfulness was unpredictable — or beyond prediction, because it was so apparent.

It is both overrated and underperforming.

It is not a sleeping giant. It is a creeping giant, crawling slothlike down a hill to a boomshaw where it will try to swim but fall to the bottom of the beautiful abyss under its own slovenly weight to drown and eventually be consumed by heretofore undiscovered creatures with no eyes.

That’s a lot of pretty words to describe a decrepit scene. And these days, people want numbers. Oh, but the numbers. There is no poetry in arithmetic, which is fine because there’s no poetry to describe how woeful the Metro is, unless there’s undiscovered verse from an especially dark day in Emily Dickinson’s life. Here’s the numbers anyway:

Read the rest of this entry »

Great Game Previews In History: 22 October 2013

by J.R.

Today In History

sartre-3Jean-Paul Sartre is awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature “for his work which, rich in ideas and filled with the spirit of freedom and the quest for truth, has exerted a far-reaching influence on our age.”

Sartre famously refused the prize, via an open letter, possibly addressed to Miley Cyrus, in Le Figaro, published the next day.

Sartre gave all manner of predictably Sartrety reasons for the refusal — that he did not want to entangle the Nobel committee with his increasingly political activism (he cited his support of Venezuelan revolutionaries specifically; Sartre was arrested during the May 1968 protests in Paris and was pardoned by DeGaulle because “You don’t arrest Voltaire”) and that he found the Nobel Prize to be exceedingly Eurocentric (it was and is, for better or worse), and that he was more interested in bridging the gap between East and West than in holding an award that demonstrates the gap.

Read the rest of this entry »

IIIiteracy: 5 October 2013

by J.R.

A recap of tonight’s Conference III action with help from the geniuses on social media:

Read the rest of this entry »

Great Game Previews In History: 5 October 2013

by J.R.

This Day In History

428px-PrincepotemkinIn 1791, Prince Grigory Aleksandrovich Potemkin-Tavricheski dies on the steppes. He caught a fever a few weeks earlier in Jassy — where he was negotiating a treaty with the Ottomans, fasted briefly and recovered some strength, but refused medicine and began to feast once again, consuming a “ham, a slated goose and three or four chickens.”

Potemkin was a Russian military leader, statesman, nobleman and favorite of Catherine the Great, who lent his name to Potemkin villages — stage managed towns erected along Russian railways designed to give the impression the south of the Empire was far richer than it was.

To use hockey terms, the Potemkin villages were like a high PDO — false richness built on a fraud.

Read the rest of this entry »

IIIiteracy: 1 October 2013

by J.R.

A recap of tonight’s Conference III action with help from the geniuses on social media:

Read the rest of this entry »

Great Game Previews In History: 1 October 2013

by J.R.

800px-Congress_of_ViennaToday In History:

The Congress of Vienna opened in…uh…Vienna Oct. 1, 1814. The Great Powers of Austria, Great Britain, Russia, Prussia and France, along with pretty much everyone else in Europe got together to redraw the map of Europe and usher in a new power structure. Conference III — drawn together by the powers-that-be — will seek to do the same for the NHL.

Read the rest of this entry »

Hello Mudduh, Hello Fadduh: Conference III Camp Report, 14 September 2013

by J.R.

hmhf45aAs camps continue in Conference III, we’ll do a daily check-in on what’s happening across The Heptarchy. Most of the time, frankly, this is going to be by Twitter search or maybe Google if we are feeling especially inspired. Sometimes the Nashville report may be done in person. We’ll see if our buddy Gord Stinkhole wants to check in from Winnipeg. And if any of y’all have any insights from a camp visit, fire ‘em to conferencethree[at]gmail[dot]com. We’ll totally rip off your content.

Read the rest of this entry »